Health

The impact of smart tools on headaches

While research has not yet proven that reducing the duration of use of a monitor can reduce migraine attacks, but caution dictates that you do so.

Smartphones and tablets are one of the most popular gadgets in the world right now, and many people spend a lot of time working with this device every day, doing activities such as searching the Internet, watching movies or connecting with their friends. they give.

Is smartphone use a migraine trigger?

According to Warrior, smartphones, despite all the benefits they bring to humans and make it easier to do various things with a device that fits in a pocket, but they also have disadvantages. The amount of time you spend in front of a monitor can contribute to migraines and headaches.

The relationship between migraines and the duration of use of the monitor

According to a study published in the journal Cephalalgia, spending too much time in front of the screen of devices such as smartphones and tablets is one of the causes of migraine headaches. The study, which involved 5,000 young adults (mean age 20 years), looked at how long each person spent in front of the screen, including working with a computer, tablet, smartphone, and television, and whether migraines or symptoms Had experienced a non-migraine headache, was evaluated.

Screen usage time was measured using a six-point scale that included:

Do not use the display = 0

Less than 30 minutes = 1

Thirty minutes to two hours = 2

Two to four hours = 3

Four to eight hours = 4

More than eight hours = 5

The results showed that as the duration of use of a monitor increased, so did the risk of migraine attacks. No association was observed between the duration of use of a monitor and non-migraine headaches.

Why is increasing the duration of using a monitor more associated with migraines?

It is difficult to say what the biological link is between the duration of using a monitor and migraines because they are likely to vary from person to person.

For some, this can be a direct relationship. For example, blue light emitted from the screen of a TV or cell phone or the glare of a screen light can trigger a migraine. Conversely, for others, the link may be more complex. For example, the duration of using a monitor may lower a person’s overall migraine threshold. Hence, exposure to other migraine stimuli is likely to trigger a migraine attack.

In other words, the amount of time spent in front of a monitor makes a person vulnerable to migraine if they are prone to it.

It is also possible that prolonged use of a monitor may increase the risk of migraines. In other words, a person who watches too much television may ignore daily meals, which can trigger migraines. Similarly, a person who stays up late and plays video games may experience an irregular sleep pattern. Because malnutrition and sleep deprivation are common triggers for migraines, overuse of a smartphone or other forms of exposure to a monitor can indirectly lead to more migraine attacks.

Other potential migraine triggers that may occur as a result of spending too much time in front of a monitor include poor posture, eye fatigue, or eating as many migraine triggers as possible.

Excessive stress is another known trigger of migraines. When you are stressed, you are more likely to spend more time working with your smartphone or watching TV.

How can I discard my mobile phone or tablet?

While research has not yet proven that reducing the duration of use of a monitor can reduce migraine attacks, but caution dictates that you do so. Of course, this can be a challenging task, but do your best. The following strategies can help you reduce the time you spend using a monitor:

Schedule non-tech times at home, especially when it comes to meals and family outings.

Set a timer on your computer or TV to turn off the device automatically.

Leave the cell phone in the car overnight.

Consider hobbies that take you away from technology, such as swimming, hiking, painting, or going to the library.

Consult a doctor to reduce the duration of use of a monitor, especially if it is too much.

If you notice that the duration of use of a monitor predisposes you to migraines, do a deeper examination to find the cause and focus on resolving it. Does too much work cause migraines? Do you need an optometry test? Can short breaks and neck and back stretching help?

Finally, it should be noted that reducing the duration of use of a monitor may have more health benefits in addition to reducing the risk of migraines. For example, research has shown that prolonged use of a monitor is associated with obesity, vision problems, low levels of physical activity, attention problems, and hyperactivity.

As a result, reducing the time spent browsing and playing video games can not only help your head, but also other parts of the body such as the back and eyes.

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